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Texting and Driving: Why it is Bad?

In today’s society, people use technology every day. When we receive a notification from our phones, we get “instant gratification,” but having this feeling can cause great loss. We are tempted to check our phones whenever we hear a ‘ting’, whether it is a text message or social media notification. People in this day and age expect everything right away? because of technology.  Since kids want this immediately, they feel the need to text back. This can become a big safety issue when driving and should be eradicated We must think to ourselves: is taking someone else’s life worth the “instant gratification?” This issue has become a trend, accidents rising, more distracting and can be stopped. When behind the wheel, phones should automatically lock, disabling access to it until coming to a complete stop.

Texting-and-driving-related-accidents will decline if phones automatically disables any features while driving. Teens get in so many accidents because of texting and driving. According to the AAA, twenty-one percent of teen drivers involved in fatal car accidents were distracted by their cell phones. Even adults are part of the issue; according to a survey done by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project, around twenty-seven percent of American adults reported texting while driving. If we put limits to texting and driving, this rate will decrease; therefore, we will be saving more lives.  If there is no access to phones while driving, we won’t feel the need to touch it.

Texting and driving has become an increasing trend. In order to stop this, we have to put safety features on the phone that disables the user when the car reaches a certain speed. Texting and driving should be taken more seriously. People do not realize how distracting it is. “Texting while driving is equivalent to being legally drunk (limit of 0.08 BAC),” according to a study lead by the University of Utah. Other studies conducted by the University of Utah states that people who use a phone while driving are four times likely to get in a collision, and the rates increase twenty times if you are texting while driving. If you do not drink and drive, do not text and drive. Is it all really worth the “instant gratification?” No, the text can wait.

Distractions while driving is super maleficent and needs to stop. According to the National Center for Statistics and Analysis, “sending or reading a text takes your eyes off the road for five seconds. At 55 mph, that’s like driving the length of an entire football field, blindfolded.” This is horrid, and something needs to be done.  

Texting and driving is serious and something needs to be done. If  we continue to text and drive, those death rates will increase. It is not worth “instant gratification.” Unfortunately, laws and fines will not stop people who text and drive which is why there should be a lock on the phone.